Cyber Thieves​

TUI VOICE DESK

5-Oct-20

Financial fraud can be broadly defined as an intentional act of deception involving financial transactions for purpose of personal gain. Fraud is a crime, a civil law violation. It is an attempt to deceive another for financial gain. A clear example of fraud is selling a new issue that does not really exist. For example, a company collects money from investors to finance operations, pockets money and does nothing. There are many kinds of fraud. Common types include forgery of documents, false claims in insurance, and filing bankruptcy to avoid debt.

Higher internet connectivity in India has also given cyber criminals a bigger playing field, with online fraudsters targeting bank customers by hacking their accounts. In fact, there has been a 30% rise in the number of online banking fraud complaints in the last year.

Internet has conquered our lives and everything else. Besides providing in-depth access to knowledge, satiating our curiosities and letting us voice our opinions, Internet is responsible for fostering innovative minds. The result: Internet of Things and Net Neutrality have come to be the new tech buzzwords. With Internet of Things, the daily physical objects like watches, washing machines, refrigerators, etc. now come to enjoy network connectivity to send and receive data. Net neutrality, on the other hand determines free and unobstructed access to various apps and websites on internet-enabled smartphones and computer systems.

Around 16 million fraud emails pass through spam filters and 8 million are opened daily, which is a huge cause of concern. Attackers can even combine phishing with Cross-Site Scripting (XSS) attacks to steal anything from credit card details to internet banking passwords. At server end, SQL Injection and Cross Site Request Forgery (XSRF) vulnerabilities allow hackers to get into system database and steal information from thousands of users.” From ‘Vishing’ (Voice Phishing), spywares inserted in computers, ATM-level hacking, e-wallet hacking to fake job offers and harmful viruses, the online crimes are increasing day by day.

Do’s

Consider disabling file sharing on your computer.
Be careful about opening attachments, especially from unknown senders.
Familiarize yourself with a Web site’s privacy policy, especially if you are asked to provide confidential and/or personal data.
Review bank and credit card statements regularly.
Install and regularly update software firewall, antivirus, and anti-spyware solutions.
Keep your Windows operating system and all your applications updated with the latest security patches. Create strong passwords and protect them carefully or consider using password protection software.
Norton Internet Security encrypts passwords for secure storage, monitors them for unapproved usage, and notifies you when a Web site offers secure login capabilities.
Lock your home mailbox.
Shred bank and credit card statements and other financial data before disposal.
Strong passwords have eight characters or more, and use a combination of letters, numbers, and symbols.
Take advantage of your right to a free annual credit report. If you think you’ve become a victim of ID theft or cybercrime, report it to the proper authorities immediately.

Don’ts

Don’t provide personal data to anyone over the phone or in person (for a job or loan application, for example) unless you are certain of the other party’s trustworthiness.
Don’t ever give out your personal information in response to an email, a web site you’ve come to through an external link, or a popup screen that appears on a real Web site.
Open a new browser window and type the URL directly into the address bar to ensure the site is legitimate.
Don’t keep financial data on laptops unless absolutely necessary; laptops are far more likely to be stolen than desktops.
Consider disabling file sharing on your computer. Be careful about opening attachments, especially from unknown senders. Familiarize yourself with a Web site’s privacy policy, especially if you are asked to provide confidential and/or personal data.
Install software firewall, antivirus, and anti-spyware solutions.
Keep your Windows operating system and all your applications updated with the latest security patches. Create strong passwords and protect them carefully or consider using password protection software.